News

Archive

Monthly Archives: July 2012

Let’s keep the Carnaval caravan rolling, shall we? Next up: two ghostly little guys from Chris Ryniak — an original sculpt up top (this one KILLS me, SO cute) and a grey Bubblegut perched in a cubby below. I’m not sure if it’s the Instagram filter or the paint Chris used, but Bubblegut’s eyes seem to have a gorgeous, black/silver pearlescence to them, which really pops against his flat grey body (I’m not sure if the figure is done, mind you).

Both of these pieces will be up for ogling at Le Carnaval des Spectres at Artoyz Paris, opening Sept. 13th. Brandt Peters, Kathie Olivas, Travis Louie, Amanda Louise Spayd and Teodoru Badiu will also be exhibiting new works.

Oh hot damn, remember these two?! Kathie and Brandt’s Ultra Squid Girl figure made its debut as a prototype at the Super7 booth during SDCC 2011.

Now, this probably goes without saying, but this is a very complicated sculpt and production on the vinyl edition is still up in the air, but the GOOD NEWS is that resin versions of the sculpt EXIST. What you see above is the first hand painted set to be revealed (we’ve also seen a lone Squid Skull), and is part of Le Carnaval des Spectres in Paris this September. Unlike the vinyl edition, these figures cannot be stacked (originally the Squid Girl on the left was intended to slip over the Skull), but I don’t think I’d want to conceal the sheer awesomeness of that irradiated invertebrate, anyway! We’re talking handpaints, people! Just when you thought this figure couldn’t get sexier … ;)

Plenty more pics and info to come; this is startin’ to get good!

 

For Le Carnaval des Spectres, Amanda Louise Spayd will have an assortment of her signature dumpy dudes, likely of various sizes, shapes and smiles. She’s kept mum over progress pics so far, but recently dropped these two hypnotic little faces. Totally digging the soul-sucking eyes.

One of the perks of Mandi recently acquiring an iPhone is that she’s on Instagram (@amandalouisespayd). Instagram means delicious, visual stimuli: we get a daily dose of Mandi’s discerning, rustic-antiquey-freaky taste, and also further insight into her artistic process, which we rarely, if ever, see. Look, Ma! It’s Easy-Bake!

The below image has got to be one of my favourite progress pics from her. And not because it reminds me of cut Pillsbury cookies from the tube, but I had no idea that this is how it all starts. They’re so … flat! Ya learn something new every day.

More eye candy to come!

Le Carnaval des Spectres opens Sept. 13 through Oct. 20th at Artoyz Shop + Galerie in Paris, France.

The annual Triple Crown of YoYo is blowing through the windy city this weekend and in celebration of the event, TCY, in collaboration with Rotofugi and Squibbles Ink., will debut the first painted colourway of the event’s handsome mascot, the Triple Crown Monster, this Saturday, July 28th!

Designed by Chris Ryniak and sculpted by Shinbone Creative’s Scott Wetterscheider, the trophy/toy hybrid stands 7 inches tall and, with that solid gorilla stance, an impressive 8 inches wide. The orange beastlie will be available at the YoYo Expert table for $100 + tax. He’s a run of only 50 pieces.  Some will be reserved for the World YoYo contest in Orlando in August and any runaways will be sold by Triple Crown, so keep tabs on their news page.

Unpainted orange versions of the figure will also be offered at the YoYo Expert table for $80 + tax. Any leftovers of the naked mascot will be available via Rotofugi on Monday, July 30th.

ALSO! Be sure to pop by Rotofugi after the event Saturday for Triple Crown’s official after party from 6pm to 8pm. There will be snacks and drinks and a ton of YoYo fun with some of the country’s best players.

[via Rotofugi]

Jaw. On. The. Floor.

Scott Radke was recently commissioned by indie filmmaker Jim McKenzie to bring two of his characters to life, Roach and Fred the dog, from McKenzie’s fantasy-drama short, King Killian.

I could go on and on about how fabulous these sculpts are, but your time would be far better served watching the film. It’s the most powerful 2 minutes and 23 seconds you’ll experience today.

I know. Hits you right where it hurts the most. The Killian project was McKenzie’s labour of love for two years, working on it while attending college and then eventually finishing it as part of his degree. If you’re interested in the project, check out the King Killian blog for some insight into the process.

Now isn’t this cool. Over the years we’ve seen Chris Ryniak tackle many a monster; we’ve seen his interpretation of Rayolas, of Stitches and of Buff Monsters. He’s even taken on YHWH. But it wasn’t until last year’s Late Season at Stranger Factory that I saw my first 100% genuine Chris Ryniak ghost.

This was really interesting to me. Up until then, I’ve always viewed Chris’ creatures as being very real, substantial, living creatures. They leave foot prints and trails of slobber, scavenge your crumbs and roam the wooded areas. But then I saw this and it changed everything:

This is Ryniak’s ‘How It’s Made’. It’s a ghost-type creature eating candy corn … and, uh, producing recycled leaf matter :)

I was instantly wowed when I saw this as it was the first time I had seen the tangible and phantasmal collide in Chris’ universe.

Fast forward to now and he teases this on Instagram (@chrisryniak), calling it “spooky leftovers”:

It’s armature, yes. But look at the sketch. “Spooky leftovers”? Sounds like a ghost with an appetite. Which would certainly fit Chris’ MO, not to mention that Le Carnaval des Spectres is creeping up real fast. Eeeee!

With themes centred around ghosts, spirits and early American spiritualism, the CP gang is sure to pull out all of their best tricks for this one. They live for this. And let’s be honest: we’re due for a good haunt.

Le Carnaval des Spectres is a Circus Posterus group exhibition featuring new works from Brandt Peters, Kathie OlivasTravis Louie, Chris Ryniak, Amanda Louise Spayd and Teodoru Badiu.  The event opens Sept. 13th at Artoyz Shop + Galerie in Paris, France.

And the instagram teasers continue with two killer snaps from Brandt Peters and Kathie Olivas for Paris’ Le Carnaval des Spectres. First up: a herd of Phantom Zombambies! You all probably remember these debuting at Monsters & Misfits II as a series of three berry-rific customs. Well now the Zombs return in all their guts and g(l)ory as an edition. The first batch will drop at Le Carnaval, followed by the usual forum blitz and so on.

And check these out! The wall-mounted Skelve mask has seriously leveled up with the addition of niblet teeth, long noses, evil grins, etc. Some even have filled in eyes — take a look at the one in the second row, far right. It looks like metal pieces are embedded in the sockets with epoxy resin. Freaking crazy! … More to come from everyone soon!

Le Carnaval des Spectres is a Circus Posterus group exhibition featuring new works from Brandt Peters, Kathie Olivas, Travis Louie, Chris Ryniak, Amanda Louise Spayd and Teodoru Badiu.  The event kicks off Sept. 13th at Artoyz Shop + Galerie in Paris, France.

 

Aside from the 20 or so paintings that will grace the walls of New York’s AFA Gallery, Kathie also plans to have a parade of mischievous and enchanting little ladies hanging about the floor, as well.

Giant encrusted Elizabeth heads, custom Lizzies, and a brand new edition (below) will make an appearance at the show, among many other friends. October can’t come fast enough.

On Instagram? Follow @circusposterus for the latest reveals and progress pics … we’re just getting started!

Oooo, this oughta be good. It’s been a little over a year since Doktor A’s stellar UK solo exhibition, Mr. Whistlecraft’s Tarnished Daydreams, and he’s now tuning up for a retrobotic steampunk soiree at myplasticheart in NYC this October with A Postcard from New Yorkshire.

“I will have some more adventurous pieces on show,” Dok writes from his studio in the UK. “I have been pushing some boundaries and learning some new skills for this one. More involved and intricate constructions than I have undertaken in the past.”

The show will feature more original creations than custom toys, as well as a new series of ink drawings to complement the dimensional pieces. The Doktor also promises some surprises as he explores new avenues and territories that have been on his bucket list for some time.

A Postcard from New Yorkshire opens Oct. 12th with a reception from 7pm to 10pm. And yes, the Doktor will be in to visit!

I’d be willing to bet that most of you know Dennis Larkins’ work and don’t even know it. Despite his expansive, 40-year-plus art career as a 3D painter and being one of the major players in LA’s Lowbrow movement in the ’80s and ’90s, Larkins is probably best known for his rock art, having created some of the Grateful Dead’s most famous gig posters for their now legendary stints at the Warfield in San Fran and NYC’s Radio City Music Hall in October 1980.

Like many artists, Larkins was well accustomed to having parallel careers, working as a scenic artist, set designer and rock n’ roll art director, while still actively pursuing his own artistic exploits. In the late ’80s, he went from Dead artist to Disney Imagineer, designing exhibits and attractions for Disneyland and Disney World.

But then there was the other side of Larkins’ work: the sci-fi nerdery, the dark humor, the sculpted dimensional relief … this is where it gets particularly interesting, at least from a designer toy standpoint.

Let me put it this way: the whole premise behind the toy movement was to redefine the canvas; to take characters from a 2 dimensional world and reimagine them in 3D. To make them tangible, ‘real’, and in a form that is more interactive for the collector. Well, Larkins had a similar idea about 30 years prior, but did it without abandoning the canvas. Instead, he started building upon it. Using foam, rubber and various plastics, Larkins pioneered a whole new chapter of conceptual realism. By applying a combination of low- and high-relief sculpture right onto the canvas, he’s able to create the illusion of an entire scene popping out at us. Some paintings have many layers, some only a few, but even his ‘deepest’, most complex pieces never exceed five inches. This was entirely new to the art scene in the 70s and transformed the canvas’ expressivity.

I recently caught up with Larkins to discuss his work, his plans with Stranger Factory and his move back to Santa Fe, NM, from LA after a 20 year absence.

Read More